Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

Award Date

1939

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Dairy Science

Abstract

Of all the equipment used in the manufacture of butter, no single piece has as close contact with the finished product as does the churn while at the same time no piece of equipment is more difficult to keep properly cleaned. The workers in the dairy industry have expended much time and effort attempting to build a churn which could be kept in a more satisfactory state, especially from a bacteriological point of view. As yet no satisfactory material for churn construction has been found to replace wood which at best is difficult to keep free of micro-organisms. Since it is admittedly difficult to achieve satisfactory cleanliness in a wooden churn, a relatively simple test is desirable to determine the effectiveness of the particular cleaning method being used. For this purpose the yeast and mold count has been developed and is now widely accepted as an indication of the bacteriological state of the butter as well as of the churn in which the butter is manufactured. Since butter is a perishable product, rigid precautions must be taken to make sure that it will retain its more desirable flavors during long periods in storage. At certain seasons of the year a large part of the butter produced in this country is not immediately consumed and it is highly that desirable that some method be perfected which will make it possible to predict the keeping quality of the millions of pounds which must be put into storage each year. Since the yeast and mold count is commonly made on a large part of the butter manufactured, it has been thought possible that it might give an indication as to what butter might be stored and what butter should be immediately put on the market. This investigation was undertaken to study the relationship between the yeast and mold count of the butter and the churn washing methods employed by several South Dakota and Minnesota creameries and to note any possible correlation of these counts to the keeping quality of the butter. Of all the equipment used in the manufacture of butter, no single piece has as close contact with the finished product as does the churn while at the same time no piece of equipment is more difficult to keep properly cleaned. The workers in the dairy industry have expended much time and effort attempting to build a churn which could be kept in a more satisfactory state, especially from a bacteriological point of view. As yet no satisfactory material for churn construction has been found to replace wood which at best is difficult to keep free of micro-organisms. Since it is admittedly difficult to achieve satisfactory cleanliness in a wooden churn, a relatively simple test is desirable to determine the effectiveness of the particular cleaning method being used. For this purpose the yeast and mold count has been developed and is now widely accepted as an indication of the bacteriological state of the butter as well as of the churn in which the butter is manufactured. Since butter is a perishable product, rigid precautions must be taken to make sure that it will retain its more desirable flavors during long periods in storage. At certain seasons of the year a large part of the butter produced in this country is not immediately consumed and it is highly that desirable that some method be perfected which will make it possible to predict the keeping quality of the millions of pounds which must be put into storage each year. Since the yeast and mold count is commonly made on a large part of the butter manufactured, it has been thought possible that it might give an indication as to what butter might be stored and what butter should be immediately put on the market. This investigation was undertaken to study the relationship between the yeast and mold count of the butter and the churn washing methods employed by several South Dakota and Minnesota creameries and to note any possible correlation of these counts t o t he keeping quality of the butter.

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Butter
Creameries

Description

Includes bibliographical references (pages 18-19)

Format

application/pdf

Number of Pages

27

Publisher

South Dakota State University

Included in

Dairy Science Commons

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