Document Type

Dissertation - Open Access

Award Date

2008

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Health and Nutritional Sciences

First Advisor

Matthew Vukovich

Abstract

Purpose: While benefits of exercise after a cardiac event are well documented, participation in and adherence to cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs is often low. The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of a self- efficacy coaching intervention (SCI): a simple theory-based behavioral intervention to increase self-efficacy for independent exercise as well as independent exercise behavior in CR patients. It was hypothesized that persons receiving the SCI treatment (T) would have higher levels of self-efficacy for exercise and greater participation in independent exercise than participants in an attention control (C) group.
Methods:
People referred to a hospitalbased CR program by their physician were invited to participate in the study (N = 65). Participants were assigned to either T or C groups which had been randomly designated by class time. The SCI was administered approximately every two weeks by CR staff as a supplement to standard CR care. Patients in the T group received coaching about independent exercise, patients in the C group received coaching matched for time and technique but covering information about healthy eating. Self-efficacy for independent exercise was assessed at the beginning and end of the supervised CR program with an Exercise Self-Efficacy (ESE) scale and a Barriers Self-Efficacy (BARSE) scale. Participation in independent exercise was determined by self- report with activity logs. Outcome differences between T and C groups were analyzed through one-way ANOVA. Results: Mean change scores for the T group were larger than those seen in the C group, but differences between groups were not statistically significant (p > .10). Significant difference between change scores for ESE, BARSE and independent exercise were noted when interaction effects between SCI treatment and previous exercise were considered.
Conclusions:
This study adds to the limited body of knowledge about theory-based interventions in cardiac rehabilitation programs and takes an important step in translating self-efficacy theory into a simple, practical application that will promote maintenance of lifestyle changes in this population.

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Heart -- Diseases -- Patients -- Rehabilitation.
Heart -- Diseases -- Patients -- Exercise therapy.
Heart -- Diseases -- Patients -- Psychology.
Self-efficacy.

Description

Includes bibliographical references.

Format

application/pdf

Number of Pages

102

Publisher

South Dakota State University

Rights

In Copyright - Educational Use Permitted
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Share

COinS