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Document Type

Thesis - University Access Only

Award Date

2003

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Graduate Nursing

First Advisor

Dianna Sorenson

Keywords

medical care of indian women, medical care of pregnant women, psychological aspects of pregnancy, social aspects of pregnancy, prenatal care

Abstract

Early and adequate prenatal care are associated with favorable birth outcomes. Yet, in 2000 South Dakota statistics revealed that only 59.1% of Native American women received prenatal care in the first trimester. Furthermore, the percentage of Native American women who received no prenatal care in any trimester was 2.2%. Reasons women do not seek early and adequate prenatal care are complex, and may be related to psychosocial barriers to prenatal care. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the level of prenatal care was significantly related to women's psychosocial barriers including: (a) psychosocial stressors, (b) an unplanned pregnancy, (c) negative attitudes toward their pregnancies, (d) the absence of a partner, and (e) the presence of a violent relationship.
This investigation was a retrospective, descriptive, correlational study. The study sample consisted of 78 Native American women served by an Indian Health Care facility. Instruments were administered by two public health nurses during the first and second prenatal visits between 1997 and 1998. The level of prenatal care (determined as the study outcome) was examined in relationship to five antecedent study variables. The level of prenatal care was significantly correlated (p<.05) with: (a) an unplanned pregnancy, (b) negative attitudes toward the pregnancy, and (c) the presence of a violent relationship. No significant correlations were found between the level of prenatal care and: (a) psychosocial stressors, and (b) the absence of a partner. With this information, strategies to enhance screening during prenatal care can be more sensitively developed for this population of Native American women served by an Indian Health Care facility. These strategies could enhance services that currently exist to prevent barriers and promote optimal care.

Number of Pages

101

Publisher

South Dakota State University

Rights

Copyright © 2003 Adelia Cuka. All rights reserved

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