Document Type

Article

Publication Date

9-2014

Keywords

porcine, epidemic, diarrhea, virus, PEDV, Sal CURB®, feed, bioassay, formaldehyde

Abstract

Background: Since its initial detection in May 2013, porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) has spread rapidly throughout the US swine industry. Recently, contaminated feed was confirmed as a vehicle for PEDV infection of naïve piglets. This research provides in vivo data supporting the ability of a liquid antimicrobial product to reduce this risk.
Results: Sal CURB® (Kemin Industries, Des Moines, IA, USA) is a FDA-approved liquid antimicrobial used to control Salmonella contamination in poultry and swine diets. To test its effect against PEDV, Sal CURB®-treated feed was spiked with a stock isolate of PEDV (Ct = 25.22), which PEDV-naïve piglets were allowed to ingest via natural feeding behavior (ad libitum) for a 14-day period. For the purpose of a positive control, a separate group of piglets was allowed to ingest non-treated (Sal CURB®-free) feed also spiked with stock PEDV (Ct = 25.22). A negative control group received PEDV-free feed. Clinical signs of PEDV infection (vomiting and diarrhea) and viral shedding in feces were observed in the positive control group 2–3 days post-consumption of non-treated feed. In contrast, no evidence of infection was observed in pigs fed Sal CURB®-treated feed or in the negative controls throughout the 14-day study period. In addition, the Sal CURB®-treated feed samples had higher (p < 0.0001) mean PEDV Ct values than samples from the positive control group.

Conclusions: These data provide proof of concept that feed treated with Sal CURB® can serve as a means to reduce the risk of PEDV infection through contaminated feed. Furthermore, the results from the positive control group provide additional proof of concept regarding the ability of contaminated feed to serve as a risk factor for PEDV infection of naïve piglets.

Publication Title

BMC Veterinary Research

Volume

10

Issue

220

Pages

6

Type

text

Language

en

DOI of Published Version

10.1186/s12917-014-0220-9

Publisher

BioMed Central

Rights

Copyright © 2014 Dee er al.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.