Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

Award Date

1979

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Wildlife and Fisheries Science

Abstract

Studies were conducted to evaluate the Big Stone Power Plant cooling reservoir in northeastern South Dakota as a site for cage culturing channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) for market and sport fishery stocking. Temperatures suitable for catfish culture (21-32 C) were present in the reservoir from mid-March through mid-September 1978 and from mid-October through 4 November 1978, the end of the study period. Mean values of chemical parameters analyzed included dissolved oxygen - 8.8 mg/1, total available chlorine- 0.13 mg/1, pH - 8.6, specific conductance - 2228 micromhos/cm, total hardness - 1128 mg/1 as CaC03, calcium hardness - 570 mg/1 as CaC03, and alkalinity - 136 mg/1 as CaC03. Values for all chemical parameters analyzed were found to be within the range of suitability for catfish culture. Channel catfish 2.2 g in weight and 59 mm total length were cage cultured in the cooling reservoir at densities of 300 fish per m3 and 500 fish per m3 to determine the optimum stocking density. After 31 days fish stocked at 300 per m3 averaged 2.4 g and 60 mm while fish stocked at 500 per m3 averaged 2.8 g and 63 mm. There were no significant differences in length or weight (P > 0 .1) between the 2 treatments. The optimum stocking density appeared to be at least 500 fish per m3. Beginning in May 1978 channel catfish 5.7 g in weight and 88 mm total length were cage cultured in the cooling reservoir to determine if a sinking feed could suitably replace the more expensive floating feed normally used in cage culture. After 147 days of culture fish fed floating feed averaged 109 g and 232 nun with feed conversion and survival rates of 1.46 and 89.7%. Fish fed sinking feed averaged 76 g and 211 mm total length with feed conversion and survival rates of 2.21 and 87. 1%. Floating feed was judged superior to sinking feed for cage culturing channel catfish larger than 110 mm total length since fish fed floating feed showed significantly;· greater increases in weight and length (P< 0 . 05) and better feed conversion (P< 0.05) than fish fed sinking feed. However, sinking feed produced growth equal to floating feed when fingerlings averaged less than 110 mm total length. Channel catfish averaging 2.3 g and 65 mm total length were cultured to determine the most efficient food among 4 types tested. The feed type, mean weight, length, and percent survival after 36 days of culture were as follows: floating pelleted feed, 3.1 g, 66 mm, 91%; sinking powder,3.5 g, 69 mm, 93%; sinking pelleted feed, 2.7 g, 64 nun, 93%; and sinking granules, 2.8 g, 70 mm, 96%. There were no significant differences among the 4 feeding treatments with respect to weight, length, or number of surviving fish (P >O.1). In both of the 2 preceding experiments channel catfish fingerlings smaller than 110 mm total length grew as rapidly on a sinking feed diet as on a comparable floating feed diet. Consequently a savings in feed costs may be realized by feeding a sinking feed to channel catfish fingerlings smaller than 110 mm in place of the conventional floating feed. Based upon temperature, water chemistry, and catfish growth data, it appears feasible to cage culture channel catfish in the Big Stone Power Plant cooling reservoir from April through October. Catfish fingerlings stocked in April at 150 nun total length should reach marketable size (0.45 kg) in 1 growing season.

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Aquaculture -- South Dakota
Channel catfish
Big Stone Power Plant (S.D.)
Cooling ponds
Ictalurus punctatus

Description

Includes bibliographical references (pages 34-36)

Format

application/pdf

Number of Pages

66

Publisher

South Dakota State University

Rights

No Copyright - Non-Commercial Use Only
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/NoC-NC/1.0/

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