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Document Type

Thesis - University Access Only

Award Date

2013

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Animal Science

First Advisor

Cody L. Wright

Keywords

Fat, lambs, dried distillers plus solubles

Abstract

Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of source of fat supplementation on nutrient digestibility, rumen fermentation, growth performance and carcass characteristics of growing lambs. The first experiment was designed to evaluate the effects of fat supplementation from either raw corn oil (OIL) or dried distillers grains plus solubles (DIST) on total tract nutrient digestibility, rumen pH, and rumen fermentation compared to a control diet without supplemental fat (CON). Six lambs were used in a 3 X 3 replicated Latin square. Fat supplementation decreased (P < 0.02) intakes of DM, OM, NDF, ADF, and N, but increased (P = 0.01) intake of EE. Intakes of DM, OM, NDF, ADF, N, and EE were similar (P > 0.35) for the OIL and DIST diets. Treatment did not affect DM or OM digestibility (P > 0.15), but fat supplementation tended to decrease (P < 0.10) digestibilities of NDF, ADF, and N. Digestibility of EE was greater (P < 0.01) for wethers fed the fat supplemented diets. Fat source did not affect (P > 0.11) digestibilities of DM, OM, NDF, ADF, N, or EE. Neither fat supplementation in general or source of fat affected DE or ME (P > 0.10). Rumen pH was greater (P < 0.01) for lambs supplemented with both sources of fat compared to the CON diet. Millimolar concentrations of total VFA, acetate, propionate, and butyrate were greater (P < 0.01) in wethers fed the CON diet, but did not differ (P > 0.41) between fat sources. Millimolar concentrations of isobutyrate were greater (P = 0.03) in lambs fed the OIL diet than the DIST diet, but did not differ (P = 0.18) between the fat supplemented diets and the CON diet. Millimolar valerate and isovalerate concentrations were greater (P < 0.04) for lambs fed the CON diet than the fat supplemented diets. Source of supplemental fat did not affect (P = 0.61) valerate concentrations, but isovalerate concentrations were greater (P = 0.02) in lambs fed the OIL diet than the DIST diet. The second experiment was designed to evaluate source of supplemental fat from either raw corn oil (OIL) or dried distillers grains plus solubles (DIST) on growth performance and carcass characteristics in growing lambs compared to a control diet without supplemental fat (CON). Seventy two lambs (initial BW 34.3 ± 0.75 kg) were used in a complete randomized design. Cumulative DMI, ADG, G:F, and final BW were similar (P > 0.24) for lambs fed the fat supplemented diets and the CON diet, however, lambs fed the DIST diet had greater (P < 0.01) cumulative DMI, ADG, G:F, and final BW compared to the OIL diet. Supplementation with corn oil tended (P = 0.06) to decrease HCW compared to supplementation with DDGS, but there were no differences between the CON diet and fat supplemented diets (P = 0.44). No other carcass traits measured were affected by fat supplementation in general or source of fat (P > 0.20).

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Lambs--Feeding and feeds
Oils and fats in animal nutrition
Distillers feeds
Corn oil

Description

Includes bibliographical references

Format

application/pdf

Number of Pages

100

Publisher

South Dakota State University

Rights

In Copyright - Educational Use Permitted
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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