Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

Award Date

1985

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Wildlife and Fisheries Science

Abstract

To evaluate wintering habitat for ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus), this study compared microclimate regimes , as determined by wind and temperature, between shelterbelts containing 1 or 2 rows of coniferous tree species with shelterbelts comprised entirely of deciduous tree species and between wetland and shelterbelt habitats. Maximum temperatures within both shelterbelt types, particularly deciduous shelterbelts, were cooler than outside ambient air temperature during summer. Throughout November, December, and January, minimum temperatures in coniferous shelterbelts types were significantly (P≤0.04) warmer than deciduous shelterbelt types. Effectiveness of shelterbelts in reducing wind velocity decreased from an average of 71% during summer to 28% during winter. Horizontal vegetation density at roost sites in wetlands was significantly (P=0.001) more dense than that found in shelterbelts. Wind velocity at roost sites in wetlands was reduced 95% more than that found in shelterbelts. Management implications concerning design of shelterbelts for improving microclimatic conditions for pheasants during winter are discussed.

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Pheasants
Windbreaks, shelterbelts, etc. -- South Dakota

Description

Includes bibliographical references (pages 42-46)

Format

application/pdf

Number of Pages

55

Publisher

South Dakota State University

Rights

No Copyright - Non-Commercial Use Only
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/NoC-NC/1.0/

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