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Document Type

Thesis - University Access Only

Award Date

2003

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Animal Science

First Advisor

R.J. Maddock

Abstract

The objectives of this research were to evaluate consumer acceptability and willingness to pay for various beef chuck muscles. One hundred thirty-eight consumers evaluated steaks from five muscles from the beef wholesale chuck: the complexus (CP), infraspinatus (IF), serratus ventralis (SV), supraspinatus (SS), and triceps brachii (TB); one muscle from the beef wholesale brisket: the deep pectoral (DP); and one muscle from the beef wholesale rib: the longissimus (LD). The LD (ribeye) was used as a reference for comparison to the other muscles. Ten USDA Choice and ten USDA Select boneless boxed beef subprimals were used for each muscle. Subprimals were aged 14 days from box date, frozen, and cut into 2.5-cm-thick steaks. Consumers rated the IF highest for overall like, tenderness, juiciness and flavor, and assigned it the highest price per pound. The TB also was rated higher (P < 0.05) than the LD for overall like, tenderness, juiciness, flavor and price per pound. The SV and CP were rated similar to the LD for overall like, tenderness, juiciness, flavor, and price per pound. Consumers rated the SS lower than the LD for tenderness, juiciness and flavor and price. The DP was rated as the toughest, driest and blandest, resulting in assignment of the lowest price per pound. Quality grade was significant for overall like, tenderness and juiciness ratings. There was a trend for USDA Choice muscles to have higher flavor ratings than USDA Select muscles. Tenderness, juiciness, and flavor ratings were correlated with overall like ratings (r = 0.84, 0.77, 0.76, respectively) and with price (r = 0.73, 0.70, 0.68, respectively). These data indicate the IF, TB, SV and CP were acceptable and the SS and DP were unacceptable as steaks. In-home consumer steak evaluations, followed by centralized laboratory-setting auctions (n = 74 consumers) were used to determine consumer acceptability and willingness to pay for various beef chuck muscles. Four muscles from the beef chuck: the infraspinatus (IF), serratus ventralis (SV), supraspinatus (SS), and the triceps brachii (TB), and the longissimus (LD) from the rib were evaluated, with the LD used as a reference to determine price and trait differentials. Muscles from USDA Choice boneless boxed beef subprimals were aged 14 days, frozen, and cut into 2.5-cm-thick steaks. Consumers received two of each type of steak for in home evaluations of uncooked steak appearance traits and cooked steak palatability. After in-home evaluation of steaks, consumers participated in a random price auction session to determine willingness pay for those steaks. Muscles differed for overall like of appearance (P < 0.05) with the LD, TB, and SS rated similar and highest, and the SV lowest. Like of shape, size, and leanness differed among muscles (P < 0.05) with the LD and TB rated similar and highest for like of shape, and the SV the lowest; the LD rated highest for like of size, the SS and SV similar and lowest; the LD rated highest for like of leanness, the SV lowest. Palatability traits differed among muscles (P < 0.05) with the LD rated highest for overall like, and the SS and SV similar and lowest; the LD and IF rated similar and highest for tenderness, the SS and SV similar and lowest; the LD and IF rated similar and highest for juiciness, and the SS lowest; the LD and IF rated similar and highest for flavor, and the SV and SS similar and lowest. Weighted-average price per pound (determined using binding price for each auction round; n = 35) was $4.38, $4.23, $3.78, $2.82, and $1.96 for the LD, IF, TB, SS and the SV, respectively. Average price differentials (determined using all bid prices for each auction round; n = 370) differed significantly from the LD and were $-0.71, $-0.79, $-1.75, and $-2.44 per pound for the TB, IF, SS and SV, respectively. Average price differentials were not different between the TB and IF (P > 0.05). Average price differentials for the SS and SV were different from the TB and IF and each other (P < 0.05). Average appearance trait differentials were significantly correlated to average price differentials; for the IF, like of shape had the highest correlation (r = 0.28); for the TB like of leanness had the highest correlation (r= 0.52); for the SS overall like of appearance was the only significant contributor of appearance traits for average price differential (r = 0.29); for the SV like of size had the highest correlation (r = 0.46). Average palatability trait differentials were significantly correlated to average price differential; for the IF overall like had the highest correlation (r = 0.39); for the TB juiciness had the highest correlation (r = 0.45); for the SS tenderness had the highest correlation (r = 0.41 ); for the SV overall like had the highest correlation (r = 0.44). Demand analysis showed demand decreased by 2.60%, 2.44%, 2.09%, 1.96%, and 1.59% for every 1.00% increase in price for the SS, TB, LD, IF, and SV respectively. These data indicate the IF and TB were acceptable to consumers as steaks, however at prices lower than the LD.

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Beef -- Sensory evaluation
Beef -- Quality
Meat cuts

Description

Includes bibliographical references (pages 48-50)

Format

application/pdf

Number of Pages

60

Publisher

South Dakota State University

Rights

Copyright © 2003 Anna Catherine Kukowski

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