Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

Award Date

1970

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Civil Engineering

Abstract

A.General The 1969 AISC Specification for Design, Fabrication and Erection states about connections: All, connections, the rigidity of which is essential to the continuity assumed as the basis of the analysis, shall be capable of resisting the moments, shears-and axial loads to which they would be subjected by the full factored loading or any probable partial distribution thereof. The building specifications do not specify types or shapes of connections, only that they shall satisfy the conditions imposed upon them. With the acceptance of plastic design, the need arose for an economical and efficient connection. End plate connections can satisfy these requirements. In being able to meet the above requirements, end plate connections have become a great asset to structural engineering. They are remarkably versatile. The end plate connections can be designed as flexible, semi-rigid or rigid connections depending on end plate thickness and size, number and distribution of bolts. They can also be designed for field welding. Due to the geometric configuration of the end plate connection, other advantages are inherent. They are: 1) fewer pieces 2) no alignment difficulties due to variations in beam depths 3) relatively small amount of material required 4) more economy and better control by shop welding the plates to the beams 5) adaptability to computer use 6) simplicity in design, fabrication and construction 7) less detailing 8) greater leverage or moment capacity by extending the end plate above and/or below the beam flanges. A. General The 1969 AISC Specification for Design, Fabrication and Erection states about connections: All, connections, the rigidity of which is essential to the continuity assumed as the basis of the analysis, shall be capable of resisting the moments, shears-and axial loads to which they would be subjected by the full factored loading or any probable partial distribution thereof. The building specifications do not specify types or shapes of connections, only that they shall satisfy the conditions imposed upon them. With the acceptance of plastic design, the need arose for an economical and efficient connection. End plate connections can satisfy these requirements. In being able to meet the above requirements, end plate connections have become a great asset to structural engineering. They are remarkably versatile. The end plate connections can be designed as flexible, semi-rigid or rigid connections depending on end plate thickness and size, number and distribution of bolts. They can also be. designed for field welding. Due to the geometric configuration of the end plate connection, other advantages are inherent. They are: 1) fewer pieces 2) no alignment difficulties due to variations in beam depths 3) relatively small amount of material required 4) more economy and better control by shop welding the plates to the beams 5) adaptability to computer use 6) simplicity in design, fabrication and construction 7) less detailing I 8) greater leverage or moment capacity by extending the end plate above and/or below the beam flanges. With the study of oversized holes, and slotted holes, the concept of using end plate connections becomes even more feasible. It is felt that with the introduction of end plate connections into the construction field, construction time, cost, and effort would be greatly reduced. B. Review of Previous Work The use of end plate connections is a relatively new concept. There are no design specifications in the AISC codes concerning end plate connections. One of the first noted papers was in 1959 by Schutz.4 In his presentation, Schutz mentioned some work done by Fincher5 for his master's thesis. It was Schutz’s feeling that although Fincher obtained some results, they were not conclusive enough to bear mentioning. At that time end plates were referred to as Butt Type Connections.

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Bolts and nuts

Structural engineering

South Dakota State University Thesis

Format

application/pdf

Number of Pages

53

Publisher

South Dakota State University

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