Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

Award Date

1980

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Animal Science

First Advisor

W. J. Costello

Abstract

In the beef industry today, it is necessary for the beef packer to slaughter and sell his product, whether as boxed beef or carcass beef, as quickly as possible. Costs of labor, equipment, land, etc., as well as perishability of the end product, demand quick movement of fresh beef from the packer to the consumer. The present USDA beef grades attempt to measure the expected palatability of the end product, demand for quick movement of fresh beef from the packer to the consumer. The present USDA beef grades attempt to measure the expected palatability and yield of boneless, closely trimmed retail cuts from the round, loin, rib, and chuck with subjective estimates. However, if the packer thinks the yield grade or quality grade is more desirable than that indicated by the USDA grader, it is customary to “hold” that carcass an additional day in the cooler. After a time, the quality may “bloom” into the choice grade or the USDA grader can more closely examine the carcass and actually make some objective measurements to establish the final quality and/or yield grade. A more desirable final grade may result and the packer has a more valuable and more marketable carcass. An objective method of measuring palatability and cutability indicators in the beef carcass could save the shrinkage loss as well as the increased inventory and additional handling costs related to “holding” carcasses for regrading. Techniques used in remote sensing may provide those objective measurements as well as provide a method of entering carcass data into a computerized system for predicting quality and yield traits of a specific carcass. Equally important, such a computerized system may provide beef processors with cumulative estimates of quantities of the various primal or subprimal cuts that would enter inventory on a given day. The present study was designed to (1) objectively measure area of lean and fat areas at the twelfth rib interface using remote sensing techniques, (2) correlate objective measurements to actual yield of edible portion and (3) to ascertain which measurements or combination of measurements best predict cutability.

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Beef cattle -- Carcasses
Beef
Beef
Remote sensing

Format

application/pdf

Number of Pages

40

Publisher

South Dakota State University

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