Author

Mark E. Law

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

Award Date

1986

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Plant Science

Abstract

Sunflowers (Helianthus annuus L.) rank third in acreage among the world's oil crops. Approximately 185, 000 ha of sunflowers are grown in South Dakota each year. Despite sunflower's economic importance, few herbicides are available for use in the crop and many of the herbicides commonly used on soybeans (Glycine Max (L.) Merr.) and corn (Zea mays L.) will harm sunflowers. Therefore, weed infestations are a major factor confronting the sunflower grower. Wild mustard (Brassica kaber (DC.) Wheeler) and green foxtail (Setaria viridis (L.) Beauv) commonly infest sunflower fields in North and South Dakota. According to a survey in North Dakota, 94% of the sunflower fields contained green foxtail and 75% contained wild mustard. Wild mustard is very competitive and one wild mustard plant/m of crop row reduces yield. EPTC (S-ethyl dipropylthiocarbamate), trifluralin (a, a,a-trifluoro-2, 6-dinitro-N-N-dipropyl-p-toluidine), and chloramben (3-amino-2, 5-dichlorobenzoic acid) are labeled for control of annual grasses and certain broadleaf weeds in sunflower fields. Although herbicides are available for grass control, more effective ones are needed to control broadleaf weeds in sunflower fields. A postemergence herbicide would significantly aid weed control and could be used in conservation tillage.

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Sunflowers -- Weed Control
Plants, Effect of herbicides on
EPTC
Acifluorfen

Format

application/pdf

Number of Pages

56

Publisher

South Dakota State University

Rights

No Copyright - United State
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/NoC-US/1.0/

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