Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

Award Date

1977

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Agronomy

Abstract

Land utilization is becoming increasingly important; farmers and ranchers are continually striving to produce more from production sites and to realize some production from their presently non-productive areas. Progress in this direction must be forthcoming in all areas of agriculture. In the case of cool-season grass species, growth takes place in the spring and fall of the year. With the exceptions of the cool-season grass species, orchardgrass, Dactylis glomerata L., little if any mid-summer growth is produced. Orchardgrass, however, is not winter-hardy or very productive under dryland conditions in South Dakota. Currently, there are no cool-season grass varieties recommended to the farmers and ranchers of South Dakota that could satisfy the need for mid-summer, cool-season grass production. Smooth bromegrass, Bromus inermis L., is extremely winter-hardy, productive, widely-adapted, and generally accepted in South Dakota. For these reasons, development of a variety of smooth bromegrass that has the ability to use moisture and soil nutrients for mid-summer production was undertaken. The objective of this research was to study the inheritance of regrowth, persistence and other characters of seven clones selected for regrowth Gross (1974).

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Bromegrasses

Format

application/pdf

Number of Pages

48

Publisher

South Dakota State University

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