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Document Type

Thesis - University Access Only

Award Date

1999

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Human Development, Consumer and Family Sciences

First Advisor

Helen Chipman

Abstract

The South Dakota Nutrition Network (SDNN) consists of representatives from state agencies, commodity groups and educational institutions. In early 1997, the SDNN raised concern about the lack of consistency in nutrition education messages and food insecurity among people in the state. A questionnaire was developed to check the relative importance of food concerns, identify use of food information sources, assess basic food knowledge and the potential of food insecurity in South Dakota The questionnaire was administered to more than 50 individuals who met in one of eight focus group meetings. Respondents were low-income parents who were distinguished by age (< 20 years, 20 years and over) and by geographical location (urban [> 100,000 people]; suburban [50,000- 100,000 people], rural [<50,000 people] and reservation community). The questionnaire provided more detailed information about individual situations than could be captured from focus group responses. Results showed: 1) food concerns were high with respect to other family concerns; 2) most respondents received food and nutrition information from family members; 3) respondents had some knowledge of food and nutrition; 4) most respondents identified dietitians and nutritionists as additional sources for information; and 5) most respondents experienced food insecurity. These results highlight the challenge nutrition educators have in sharing information when people are not seeking it. Also, they illustrate the need for a coordinated effort in conveying consistent nutrition education messages to families as well as individuals. Results are being used to help develop a consistent state nutrition education plan. This study was part of a project, which was partially funded by the United States Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service through a Cooperative Agreement for a Nutrition Support Network.><50,000 people] and reservation community). The questionnaire provided more detailed information about individual situations than could be captured from focus group responses. Results showed: 1) food concerns were high with respect to other family concerns; 2) most respondents received food and nutrition information from family members; 3) respondents had some knowledge of food and nutrition; 4) most respondents identified dietitians and nutritionists as additional sources for information; and 5) most respondents experienced food insecurity. These results highlight the challenge nutrition educators have in sharing information when people are not seeking it. Also, they illustrate the need for a coordinated effort in conveying consistent nutrition education messages to families as well as individuals. Results are being used to help develop a consistent state nutrition education plan. This study was part of a project, which was partially funded by the United States Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service through a Cooperative Agreement for a Nutrition Support Network.

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Nutrition surveys -- South Dakota
Nutrition -- South Dakota
Food supply -- South Dakota

Format

application/pdf

Publisher

South Dakota State University

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