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Document Type

Thesis - University Access Only

Award Date

2009

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Nutrition, Food Science, and Hospitality

First Advisor

Kendra Kattelmann

Abstract

Objective: To determine if completion order of lessons, number of lessons completed, appropriate spacing of completed lessons, and amount of time spent (dose) on health and wellness web based lessons correlates to a positive behavior change in weight, waist circumference, BMI, engagement in physical activity (using METS), and/or the consumption of fruits or vegetables. Design, Setting, and Participants: The results from this study were obtained from Project WebHealth which was developed to determine if 10-internet lessons using the health-at-any-size concept will prevent excessive weight gain in college students n=1692. Participants were full-time students ages 18-24, enrolled in one of eight universities, with a BMI≥18.5 who were not pregnant or lactating, not nutrition or exercise science majors, and were free from health conditions that could interfere with dietary and exercise changes. Participants were randomized into intervention and control groups. Intervention: The intervention group had access to 10 web-based healthy lifestyle lessons, one a week for 10 weeks. Completion dates of lessons and seconds spent on lessons were tracked by the computer program. Outcome Measures and Analysis: Participants completed online surveys including questions pertaining to inclusion criteria, demographics, exercise frequency, and fruit and vegetable intake prior to study inclusion. Anthropometrics, height, weight, and waist circumference, were measured by trained personnel at each institution. Total time was converted to minutes and separated into 'time' quartiles (0-31.7, 31.7-55.9, 55.9-91.7, and ≥ 91.7 minutes) to identify mean differences of characteristics of subjects across quartiles. Associations between time and change in outcome variables were analyzed using Univariate GLM, SPSS 16.0. Results: Due to the high percentage of compliers with lesson protocol, completion order, number of lessons completed, and appropriate spacing of completed lessons were not valid discriminatory factors when compiling dose. This leaves total time as the only dose indicator. Total time spent on lessons was not significantly correlated with weight (P=.165) waist circumference (P=. 193), BMI (P=. 317), or METs (P=. 603) within the intervention group. Change in fruits (P<.001), and vegetables (P=. 001), within the intervention group, showed highly significant correlations to total time. When adding the control group to this model ( as 0 time) correlations between time and changes in fruit and vegetable consumption became more significant P><.001 and P><.001 respectfully, other variables remained insignificant. Conclusion and Implications: The longer participants spend on healthy lifestyle interventions tailored for the college student population, using the web, the greater the positive behavior change in the consumption of fruits and vegetables. Supported by the National Research Initiative of the USDA CSREES, grant #2005- 35215-15412154><.001) and vegetables (P=. 001), within the intervention group, showed highly significant correlations to total time. When adding the control group to this model (as 0 time) correlations between time and changes in fruit and vegetable consumption became more significant P<.001 and P><.001 respectfully, other variables remained insignificant. Conclusion and Implications: The longer participants spend on healthy lifestyle interventions tailored for the college student population, using the web, the greater the positive behavior change in the consumption of fruits and vegetables. Supported by the National Research Initiative of the USDA CSREES, grant #2005- 35215-154121541.><.001 and P<.001 respectfully, other variables remained insignificant. Conclusion and Implications: The longer participants spend on healthy lifestyle interventions tailored for the college student population, using the web, the greater the positive behavior change in the consumption of fruits and vegetables. Supported by the National Research Initiative of the USDA CSREES, grant #2005- 35215-154121541.

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Health education
Web-based instruction
College students -- Health and hygiene -- Study and teaching

Format

application/pdf

Publisher

South Dakota State University

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