Document Type

Dissertation - Open Access

Award Date

2021

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department / School

Graduate Nursing

First Advisor

Heidi Mennenga

Keywords

immersive simulation, Nursing Pharmacology Education, Scrambling Active Learning, Self-efficacy

Abstract

Medication competence is a priority within the academic setting, as it allows nurses to provide sound knowledge-based care and ensure safe medication delivery. Nevertheless, there is a dearth of theoretical or conceptual basis and definition of medication competence to guide assessment, analysis, and development of informed empirical evidence. Literature has also suggested current curricula do not support the complex and in-depth nature of nursing pharmacology. This dissertation paper presents three seminal manuscripts which provides the researcher’s pathway in discovering and analyzing an innovative nursing pharmacology educational strategy. The first manuscript focused on a concept analysis on medication competence, which provided guidance and direction in the development and analysis of the educational intervention to address theory to practice gaps in undergraduate nursing pharmacology. The second manuscript presents the pilot study which analyzed the effects of an eight-week synchronous online pharmacology scrambling active learning approach with immersive simulation educational intervention on accelerated baccalaureate nursing (ABN) students’ perceived self-efficacy and knowledge acquisition. The third manuscript presents the dissertation study which analyzed the effects of an eight week in-class pharmacology scrambling active learning approach with immersive simulation educational intervention on ABN students’ perceived self-efficacy and knowledge acquisition. The concept analysis of medication competence the researcher utilized the Walker and Avant’s (2011) 8-step concept analysis methodology. The pilot study followed a quasi-experimental pretest posttest design and the dissertation study followed a quasiexperimental pretest postest design with a qualitative componment. Both the pilot study and the dissertation study was guided by Bandura’s (1977) Self-efficacy theory. The manuscripts provided a concept analysis on medication competence and both quantitative and qualitative evidence that the incorporation of PSAL-IS within a nursing pharmacology course in different modalities significantly improve pharmacology selfefficacy. In addition, the qualitative component illustrated PSAL-IS was the preferred teaching method for pharmacology over lecture alone.

Number of Pages

129

Publisher

South Dakota State University

Available for download on Sunday, December 15, 2024

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Rights Statement

In Copyright