Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

Award Date

2016

Degree Name

Master of Education (MEd)

Department

Counseling and Human Development

First Advisor

Ruth Harper

Keywords

growth mindset, mastery goals, motivation, college students, achievement

Abstract

Previous research has found that mindset and goal orientation are intricately related in motivation and academic achievement, which holds significant implications for students in higher education (Dweck, 2009). While growth mindset-focused intervention has been studied, finding improvement in mastery goal-setting (Blackwell, Trzesniewski, and Dweck, 2007), goal-focused intervention accounting for student mindset has not. Firstyear college students’ implicit theory of intelligence, or mindset, was measured before they were randomly assigned to set either a mastery- or performance-based goal in relation to their first exam in a difficult chemistry course. Upon receiving their first exam score, students were free to set whatever type of goal they wished in relation to the second exam. Results indicate that students who voluntarily set mastery-based goals earned significantly higher exam scores than those who set performance-based goals. Controlling for mindset, differences in perceived success and student satisfaction based on goal orientation need to be studied further. Limitations, suggestions for future research, and implications for student affairs professionals are discussed.

Library of Congress Subject Headings

College freshmen -- Attitudes

Goal (Psychology)

Motivation (Psychology)

Mastery learning

Academic achievement

Achievement motivation

Description

Includes bibliographical references (page 23-24)

Format

application/pdf

Number of Pages

34

Publisher

South Dakota State University

Rights

Copyright © 2016 Chelsea E. Sorensen

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