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Document Type

Thesis - University Access Only

Award Date

1997

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Graduate Nursing

First Advisor

Margaret Hegge

Keywords

study and teaching nursing, cognitive styles, psychology of learning

Abstract

This non-experimental descriptive correlational study examined the relationship between self-assessed knowledge of learning style among nursing instructors in a baccalaureate degree nursing program and their use of teaching strategies. Thirty eight nursing instructors at baccalaureate degree nursing programs in the midwest geographical area participated in the study. The nurse educator survey, learning style questionnaire, and teaching strategy survey were used to gather data. The Person Product Moment Correlation Test was used to statistically analyze the data. Findings revealed that there was no significant relationship between self-assessed knowledge of learning style among nursing instructors in a baccalaureate degree nursing program and their use of teaching strategies. There were no significant correlations between experience and the use of teaching strategies. Instructors that were 45 years old or older used lecture, games, and computer assisted learning significantly more than the group of instructors under 45 years of age. There were significant correlations between certain teaching strategies among experienced teachers. Instructors that used the teaching strategy of weekly seminars had significantly higher use of the teaching strategies of case study, student presentations, and laboratory. There were several significant relationships identified with the teaching strategy of use games on a semester basis. Instructors that used games had significantly higher use of discussion, role play, case study, experiential learning, student presentations, computer assisted learning, and classroom arrangement. Levene's Test for equality of variances was used to examine differences between primarily clinical faculty and primarily classroom faculty on use of teaching strategies. Instructors that were primarily classroom used significantly more games than did primarily clinical instructors, who used no games. Instructors that were primarily classroom had significantly higher use of role play, case study, lecture, discussion, and teaching aids than primarily clinical instructors. Results of this study can be used by nurse educators to identify and limit barriers to the use of teaching strategies. Information gained from this study can also be used be institutions of higher learning to examine their faculty’s knowledge of learning style.

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Nursing -- Study and teaching
Cognitive styles
Learning, Psychology of

Number of Pages

103

Publisher

South Dakota State University

Rights

Copyright © 1997 Rebecca Randall. All rights reserved

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