Event Title

Session 12: Applications - Predicting the Origins of Artwork Found in Rural Churches

Location

University Student Union: Pasque Room 255

Start Date

12-2-2018 3:30 PM

End Date

12-2-2018 5:00 PM

Description

A few years ago, I was contacted by Rodney Oppegard, a church historian. He had spent many years collecting information on ecclesiastical furnishings and artwork found in the Lutheran churches of rural North Dakota, and while his data set was extensive it was by no means complete. Some artwork was unsigned or the signature obscured, other pieces had been transferred to different churches, and in some cases the church itself had been destroyed by fire years before, leaving only incomplete records and fading memories as clues to the original church’s configuration. Mr. Oppegard wanted to know whether there was a mathematical way to use existing data to “fill in the holes” of his data set. In this talk, I will outline how geospatial and rudimentary archival data were used to construct and evaluate models for determining which of several popular artists was responsible for a particular church’s alter painting.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Feb 12th, 3:30 PM Feb 12th, 5:00 PM

Session 12: Applications - Predicting the Origins of Artwork Found in Rural Churches

University Student Union: Pasque Room 255

A few years ago, I was contacted by Rodney Oppegard, a church historian. He had spent many years collecting information on ecclesiastical furnishings and artwork found in the Lutheran churches of rural North Dakota, and while his data set was extensive it was by no means complete. Some artwork was unsigned or the signature obscured, other pieces had been transferred to different churches, and in some cases the church itself had been destroyed by fire years before, leaving only incomplete records and fading memories as clues to the original church’s configuration. Mr. Oppegard wanted to know whether there was a mathematical way to use existing data to “fill in the holes” of his data set. In this talk, I will outline how geospatial and rudimentary archival data were used to construct and evaluate models for determining which of several popular artists was responsible for a particular church’s alter painting.