Title

Challenges in Modeling Cognition and Dementia

Presenter Information/ Coauthors Information

Terry Therneau, Mayo Clinic

Presentation Type

Event

Student

No

Track

Health Care Application

Abstract

The Mayo Clinic Study of Aging (MCSA) has collected longitudinal data from and age/sex stratified sample of Olmsted County residents over the age of 60, with a goal to better understand the natural course and determinants of cognitive decline, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia with age. The study purposefully oversamples those at the older ages, and over the course of 10+ years has accumulated date from 22443 visits of 5425 unique residents. Yet even with this large data set answering many of the questions remains challenging simply because of the long time scale.

We will look the simple question of how biomarkers of amyloid and tau evolve over time, both at the population and the patient level, and some of the statistical challenges that this represents. On autopsy, amyloid plaques and tau fibrils are the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. An underlying physical hypothesis (not universally accepted) is that amyloid precedes tau which precedes dementia. What does the data have to say about this?

Start Date

5-2-2019 1:00 PM

End Date

5-2-2019 1:50 PM

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Feb 5th, 1:00 PM Feb 5th, 1:50 PM

Challenges in Modeling Cognition and Dementia

Pheasant Room 253 A/B

The Mayo Clinic Study of Aging (MCSA) has collected longitudinal data from and age/sex stratified sample of Olmsted County residents over the age of 60, with a goal to better understand the natural course and determinants of cognitive decline, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia with age. The study purposefully oversamples those at the older ages, and over the course of 10+ years has accumulated date from 22443 visits of 5425 unique residents. Yet even with this large data set answering many of the questions remains challenging simply because of the long time scale.

We will look the simple question of how biomarkers of amyloid and tau evolve over time, both at the population and the patient level, and some of the statistical challenges that this represents. On autopsy, amyloid plaques and tau fibrils are the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. An underlying physical hypothesis (not universally accepted) is that amyloid precedes tau which precedes dementia. What does the data have to say about this?