Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

Award Date

1950

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Civil Engineering

Abstract

There does not exist to today, and perhaps there never will be, any known method of predicting the location and time at which an earthquake will occur. Neither can we predict the maximum intensity that earthquakes in any given locality will bring. Hence the practicing structural engineer is constantly faced with the problem of deciding how much , if any seismic force to include when designing any particular structure , and from the economic viewpoint, how often will this force occur. At present, he will of course be guided by the particular building code of the area in which he is working but these codes, because of the lack of any conclusive information based in research or experience, are likely to skip over the subject very lightly or to omit it altogether.

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Buildings, Reinforced concrete -- Earthquake effects

Description

Includes bibliographical references (page 57)

Format

application/pdf

Number of Pages

60

Publisher

South Dakota State University

Rights

No Copyright - Non-Commercial Use Only
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/NoC-NC/1.0/

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