Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

Award Date

1959

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Horticulture

Abstract

The objective of this research was to find a method of eliminating a high percentage of the tender genotypes in a population of apples before planting the seed. The introduction of apple culture into the Great Plains and adjacent Canadian provinces confronted horticulturists with the problem of winter hardiness. Thousands of seedlings of standard varieties were planted in an attempt to find varieties sufficiently hardy for this region of North America. Fruit breeding to develop high quality apples adapted to the northern Great Plains is an important phase of horticulture. Each new variety developed must be subjected to long and expensive field tests for hardiness studies. A considerable amount of money is spent in growing large populations, only to find that a high percentage of the seedlings in the populations are not hardy. If these tender individuals could be eliminated prior to planting, the expense involved in land and labor could be greatly reduced, and more effort could be expended on the seedlings which would have the greatest chances of being winter hardy.

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Fruit-culture
Plants -- Frost resistance
Apples

Description

Includes bibliographical references

Format

application/pdf

Number of Pages

40

Publisher

South Dakota State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts

Rights

No Copyright - Non-Commercial Use Only
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/NoC-NC/1.0/

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