Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

Award Date

1972

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Entomology-Zoology

Abstract

Dieldrin-14c was administered to chickens, ducks, and cormorants to determine: (1) the accumulation and excretion of dieldrin, (2) the importance of the uropygial gland as an organ of excretion of the insecticide. Analysis of all samples was by liquid scintillation counting (14c-analysis). Samples of whole body, uropygial glands, and feathers were taken for analysis. In addition, eggs from chickens, feces from ducks and cormorants, and ectoparasites from cormorants were analyzed. Modes of excretion included eggs, feces, uropygial glands, and skin. Chickens, ducks, and cormorants with uropygial glands averaged 3.2, 6.3, and 1.8 times more radioactivity per gram, respectively on their feathers than those whose uropygial gland had been surgically removed. Use of the uropygial gland as an organ of excretion of the insecticide was indicated. Radioactivity on the feathers of birds without uropygial glands indicated that the insecticide might have been secreted through lipoid bodies in the skin of the birds. That ingested pesticides are transferred to ectoparasites was shown when radioactivity was found on ectoparasites from cormorants. These pesticides may have an effect on ectoparasite numbers.

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Insecticides
Pesticides
Dieldren--14c.

Format

application/pdf

Number of Pages

32

Publisher

South Dakota State University

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