Author

Marco Montoya

Document Type

Dissertation - Open Access

Award Date

1974

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Sociology and Rural Studies

First Advisor

Robert T. Wagner

Abstract

A study of the 1970 South Dakota population was conducted to determine: (1) the extent of disadvantagement by magnitude and residence; (2) the association between the extent of disadvantagement and selected socio-economic factors; and (3) the extent to which factors explaining disadvantagement also served to predict migration based on the net migration experiences of South Dakota counties during 1960 to 1970. The county was selected as the unit of analysis. Selected data from the census were aggregated and tabulated. The magnitude of family and unrelated individual disadvantagement in South Dakota during 1970 was identified for rural farm, rural non-farm, and urban areas as either major, high, moderate, or low. Analysis of the extent of disadvantagement by magnitude and residence showed: (1) the magnitude of disadvantaged families was least in urban areas, moderate in rural non-farm areas, and greatest in rural farm areas; and (2) the magnitude of disadvantaged unrelated individuals was least in urban areas, moderate in rural farm areas, and greatest in rural non-farm areas. The analysis of the hypothesized association between a set of socioeconomic variables and the extent of county disadvantagement during 1970 for families and unrelated individuals used a step-wise least squares multivariate linear equation. The results showed that: 1. South Dakota counties with a high proportion of rural farm, rural non-farm, and urban families with incomes less than poverty were primarily characterized by a larger number of families with female heads of households. 2. South Dakota counties with a high proportion of rural farm, rural non-farm, and urban unrelated individuals with incomes less than poverty were primarily characterized by a larger number of county males, age 16 and over, employed as service workers, including private household workers. Analysis of the hypothesized association between a set of significant variables, associated with the magnitude of disadvantagement, and the observed variation in the extent of net migrants from each county during 1960 to 1970 showed that nine socioeconomic variables explained high county net out-migration from 1960 to 1970. Variation in observed net out-migration was found to be principally a function of limited employment of rural farm males, 16 and over, as managers and administrators in non-farm employment sectors, as farm operators, and in higher income employment sectors.

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Migration, Internal -- South Dakota
South Dakota -- Population

Format

application/pdf

Publisher

South Dakota State University

Included in

Sociology Commons

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