Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

Award Date

1950

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Dairy Science

Abstract

Since artificial insemination has become a reality and the potentialities of ova transfer are being investigated by several research workers, it seems reasonable to assume that some attention should be directed toward gathering information regarding the bacterial flora of the normal bovine uterus. Both artificial insemination and ova transfer require the insertion of foreign bodies or instruments into the uterus. When such instruments enter this organ, there is always the possibility of introducing various kinds of bacteria. Very little information is available regarding the pathogenicity of these bacteria in the bovine uterus. The possibility of abortion due to such pathogenic organisms as those causing brucellosis and trichomoniasis has been known for some time. Whether or not other contamination organisms placed in the uterus by seemingly sterile instruments will reduce fertility, increase abortions, or cause permanent sterility has not been established. In order to obtain information pertaining to the bacteriological flora of the normal uterus. Both artificial insemination and ova transfer require the insertion enter this organ, there is always the possibility of introducing various kinds of bacteria. Vary little information is available regarding the pathogenicity of these bacteria in the bovine uterus. The possibility of abortions due to such pathogenic organisms as those causing brucellosis and trichomonasis has been known for some time. Whether or not other contamination organisms placed in the uterus by seemingly sterile instruments will reduce fertility, increase abortions, or cause permanent sterility has not been established. In order to obtain information pertaining to the bacteriological flora of the normal uterus a series of experiments was devised to ascertain the following information: (a) the possibility of entering the uterus with sterile instruments, flushing the uterus with a sterile solution, and recovering a sterile solution, (b) to flush the uterus with non-sterile techniques and determine the numbers of bacteria recovered, (c) to determine the effects of traumatizing the uterus by entrance with sterile and non-sterile foreign instruments, and (d) to identify insofar as possible the different genera of organisms recovered.

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Cows

Description

Includes bibliographical references (pages 24-25)

Format

application/pdf

Number of Pages

29

Publisher

South Dakota State University

Included in

Dairy Science Commons

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