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Abstract

The student fear and anxiety exhibited in the aftermath of the recent election are unlike anything most teachers have seen. The long-term ramifications of persistent fear and anxiety are too serious to ignore. The academic consequences of living in a perpetual state of fear are dire and affect the most vulnerable students. Current literature relating to the impact fear and anxiety have on achievement is examined with suggestions for teachers and administrators wanting to better inoculate their students against the deleterious effects of stress, fear and anxiety. This article issues an urgent call for increased examination of this phenomenon.