Title

It Takes A Village…: Transgressing Rural Geographies In Sinapi's Camping à la ferme

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Version of Record

Publication Date

11-2009

Abstract

Politically and historically, France's definitions of identity have coincided with the idealization of its rural roots and frontiers (be it those of l' hexagone or la plus grande France). Throughout French history, various heads of state have encouraged a physical connection to the land, from Sully in the sixteenth century to Marechal Petain under Vichy, who said that "la terre" ("the land") was "la patrie" ("the nation"), thus locating the essence of the French country in its territory. Especially since the Third Republic, the connection between land and politics, nationhood and ideology have been not only cultural, but also legal. Through the 1889 consolidation of the droit du sol that grants French citizenship to individuals born on the French territory, the land has become the very place that literally, bestows nationality.

Publication Title

Contemporary French and Francophone Studies

Volume

13

Issue

5

First Page

555

Last Page

562

DOI of Published Version

10.1080/17409290903335626

Publisher

Taylor and Francis